Sweet Intoxication
Slaughterhouses.
"Growing up in Pennsport, we kids were exposed to a lot of different  types of commerce. Stores and factories were all over the place. Yet,  some were more more mysterious than others.Slaughterhouse were accepted  as normal in the middle of of residential area. Hey kids, stop the game  of Dead Box to make way for the tractor trailer of cows! We would  quickly learn that that cheese burger from Geno’s was from an animal  that lost it’s life in a grungy old factory. It made you hesitate for a  second and then you just continued eating. At least the fries and the  milkshake  didn’t use to have eyes.We boys had a morbid curiosity about  what went on in those places. How did the kill them and cut them up. We  love those huge bar magnets that we would sometimes get from the workers  at the slaughterhouse.We would wait for hours for a chance to get some  of those magnets. While standing in the cold drizzle, we wondered what  they were used for. One kid professed to be an expert and explained that  the workers would make the cow swallow it. Then when they shot the cow  in the head, the bullet would be drawn in further by the magnet. I  believed that trap. The magnets were in the cow way before showing up on  Moore or Dickinson Street. They were in their stomachs to prevent scrap  metal eaten by the cow in the field from entering in the digestive  system and killing the cow before we could on Moore Street. They didn’t  even use a bullet in the factory. It was a hydraulic piston gun that did  the deed. I know this post is a little much for the animal lovers, so  here is some fun. Who remembers when the cows were let free on Front  Street? The picture is the 100 block of Moore, which had a  slaughterhouse."

Slaughterhouses.

"Growing up in Pennsport, we kids were exposed to a lot of different types of commerce. Stores and factories were all over the place. Yet, some were more more mysterious than others.Slaughterhouse were accepted as normal in the middle of of residential area. Hey kids, stop the game of Dead Box to make way for the tractor trailer of cows! We would quickly learn that that cheese burger from Geno’s was from an animal that lost it’s life in a grungy old factory. It made you hesitate for a second and then you just continued eating. At least the fries and the milkshake didn’t use to have eyes.We boys had a morbid curiosity about what went on in those places. How did the kill them and cut them up. We love those huge bar magnets that we would sometimes get from the workers at the slaughterhouse.We would wait for hours for a chance to get some of those magnets. While standing in the cold drizzle, we wondered what they were used for. One kid professed to be an expert and explained that the workers would make the cow swallow it. Then when they shot the cow in the head, the bullet would be drawn in further by the magnet. I believed that trap. The magnets were in the cow way before showing up on Moore or Dickinson Street. They were in their stomachs to prevent scrap metal eaten by the cow in the field from entering in the digestive system and killing the cow before we could on Moore Street. They didn’t even use a bullet in the factory. It was a hydraulic piston gun that did the deed. I know this post is a little much for the animal lovers, so here is some fun. Who remembers when the cows were let free on Front Street? The picture is the 100 block of Moore, which had a slaughterhouse."

  1. wh0re-mouth posted this